Sue Walters Pyrography
Fine art pyrography on paper, wood and leather



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PAPER COMPOSITION
Paper can take an enormous amount of punishment.
I decide to do this picture of my favorite tree, a Eucalyptus citriadora. It has the most amazing pinkish wood under the shedding top bark...and there is always miniature life at play on it's slopes.
I took several photos of the bark and made a sketch of how I wanted the bark to look. I then used my wire nibbed burner (with a long modified nib) to literally heat carve each layer of 'bark' out of paper. The bark was then assembled on a full piece of paper that had washes applied to make it look like the pink part of the tree. I also took a ball hammer to this background paper to give it texture. I then sketched in my imaginary lizard,and ants and pyrographed the lot...bark, tree, cracks, shadows, the lizard and ants. The last step was to add colour to the bark.
Simple!

MONOCHROME ON BIRCH PLY
This piece illustrates that the type of wood you use will effect the colour of the work.
To do elephant eye without use of colour I had to choose a wood that burnt to the right colour. After much testing, I chose birch ply. If I had have chosen poplar ply, the result would have been much more yellow and not tanned as I had planned.
Almost this entire piece was done by strategic placing of dots and smudges.
Yes...it drove me insane!

NEGATIVE PYROGRAPHY WITHOUT COLOUR, PINE
The basis of this type of negative pyrography is to burn the whole surface of your wood and then engrave back into it to expose the original raw wood colour.
This was done with a dremel and a burr and has no colour or highlights.
It's done on pine.

NEGATIVE PYROGRAPHY WITH COLOUR, PINE
It's really hard to tell on this picture, but a lot of the lights of the city are actually coloured in yellows, oranges and reds. I used colour to create realism, interest and to be able to let the viewer distinguish each building and area.
The engraving was done with a dremel and burr and then paint washes were strategically applied to parts of the engraved wood.
It was done on pine.

PRESENTATION PLAQUE
I thought I'd show you a sample of a presentation plaque. This one has no colour and is made up of a composition of 3 animals in a fictitious setting. It shows how pyrography can be used in lettering also.
Can't see 3 animals? Ah..you'll have to look closely.

BURNT ON BARK
There are lots of effective and interesting things to burn on. One of them is bark. This is from a tree that is native to Australia, the Prickly Paper Bark. I found it just the same as burning on North American Birch Paper Bark.
It's an extremely soft burn and doesn't hold detail well....but it has got charm.
I used a spoon shader to sketch this.
Please note is is illegal to take paper bard from trees in some North American areas so, if in doubt, get it from a private tree.



HOME  EMAIL  GUESTBOOK  AWARDS   LINKS
THE PYRO SHOP (pyrographic supplies and books)
THE PYRO SCHOOL (online school, techniques/tips, in focus, visual diary, teaching schedule, safety)
THE PYRO GALLERY (pyrographic work) -  THE OTHER GALLERY (other art work)
THE ART SHOP (art work, commissions and prints available for sale)
THE PYRO NEWSLETTER


Sue Walters
15 Roma Parade
Upwey, Victoria
Australia, 3158
P.O.BOX 1131
Tel: (+61)(03) 9754 8207
E-mail
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Copyright Sue Walters