Sue Walters Pyrography
Fine art pyrography on paper, wood and leather



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BURNT ON PIGMENT, BASSWOOD
The shading on the zebras was created by burning on top of white pencil. I have since stopped using this technique on anything but non-toxic water colours (no lead etc) as I'm wary about the safety of wholesale burning on pigments. Until I learn more about the potential hazards, I now use this technique sparingly, in a well ventilated room and with care of colour choice.
I'll report more information in the safety section as it comes to hand.
BURNING ON BURLS
Burls can make an interesting canvas for pyrography, especially if the subject is carefully chosen to suit the characteristics of the wood.
If the burl is of a pale wood, then colour wont need to be used. Most burls however seem to need a little colour to help define the picture and contrast with the wood.
Coloured with gouache.

COLOUR PENCIL ON BASSWOOD PLY
For a more subtle feel to your work, colour pencils can be used. This is not the wax pencil, but the normal artists pencils like Derwent, Winsor & Newton, etc. Wax pencils are more vibrant in colour, but tend to collect in burnt grooves and texture, making a blobby/rougher effect)
The Roo was first burn in and then the pencil gently laid over the top. A fraction of 'overburn' was then applied to add a little punch and depth

GOUACHE & PENCIL ON POPLAR PLY
I wanted this piece to be more dynamic and powerful in colour, so chose gouache paint, which is simple an opache water colour paint. Acrylic and gouache will go over burning quite happily, where water colour and pencil wont.
For a final punch, I used a touch of bright wax pencil.
This is a Wedge Tailed Eagle, a bird native to Australia.
Burnt with a skew, shader and writer.

PYRO ON UNUSUAL WOODS
It's interesting trying different woods and seeing the effect they give. I will grab pieces of wood when I can get them to see what effect they give when burnt. This is how I discovered that burning on Grevillea robuster (Silky Oak) gives a shimmering effect. I certainly doesn't hold sharp lines very well, but a shader, used like a brush will give and interesting effect. It reminded me of being under water, so I did a Platypus diving.
Burnt with a shader.

MONOCHROME ON A GOURD
If you are after burning on a 3D project, gourds might be for you.
Hard shelled gourds generally are tan in colour, allowing less contrast than a pale wood, but a monochrome burn still gives a pleasing, antique effect.
Burnt with a skew nib and spoon shader.


HOME  EMAIL  GUESTBOOK  AWARDS   LINKS
THE PYRO SHOP (pyrographic supplies and books)
THE PYRO SCHOOL (online school, techniques/tips, in focus, visual diary, teaching schedule, safety)
THE PYRO GALLERY (pyrographic work) -  THE OTHER GALLERY (other art work)
THE ART SHOP (art work, commissions and prints available for sale)
THE PYRO NEWSLETTER


Sue Walters
15 Roma Parade
Upwey, Victoria
Australia, 3158
P.O.BOX 1131
Tel: (+61)(03) 9754 8207
E-mail
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Copyright Sue Walters